Opre' Roma! 

          Dev Leza Avlon: "it is God who brought you!"




Calendar of Observances

CALENDAR OF OBSERVANCES
JANUARY

JAN. 1: Hag’s Day – honoring the goddess as She Who Transforms
Day of Ishtar ( Inanna, Ashtart, Ashtaroth, Ashtoreth, Anat, Astarte, Anaitgis, Atar, Isis): Goddess of Love & Battle.

JAN. 2-3: Feast of Old to Greek Goddess Hekate – who guides all through transitions and crisis.

JAN. 6: Triple Goddess Day—honoring the Goddess as the Three-In-One;
Day of the Lord of the Dance – honoring Shiva, seeking his aid for prosperity and wisdom in the New Year, and for prosperity and wisdom in the New Year, and also for a spouse if desired.

JAN. 9: Festival of Isis: Mother Goddess, Great Goddess, Throne of Egypt

JAN. 16: Festival of Ganesh: God of Success

JAN. 17-18 Tu B’Shevat – Jewish Festival of Trees, celebrated with tree plantings and orchard blessings. Originally honored Old Canaanite-Hebrew Goddess Asherah.

JAN. 17-19 Feast of Fate – Ruler of Past, present, and Future, honoring Goddess as Moirai (old Greek), Norns (Old Norse), Coatlicue (Aztec), Pachamama (Inca), Manat (Old Arabic-Sufi) & Providence (Christian).

JAN. 18: Day of Danu – Celebrating the Great Mother Goddess who Shows the Way.

JAN. 23: Egyptian Day of Hathor: Goddess of Love, Tombs and the Sky.

JAN. 24-Feb 1 Sementivae – Old Roman festival of sowing, honoring Earth Goddess Terra (Greek Gaia), Grain Goddess Ceres (Greek Demeter), and Seed Goddess Proserpina (Greek Persephone).

FEBRUARY

FEB. 2: IMBOLC SABBAT: Cleansing, Purification, Quickening. Imbolc/St.Brigid’s Day – Old Celtic/Irish feast of Goddess Brigid; merged with the Christian feast of St. Brigid. Fires were lit to welcome Her as She traveled about blessing fields, animals, and people.
FEB. 7: Greek Day of Selene: Moon Goddess

FEB. 14: Norse Family Festival – Celebrated as Valentine’s Day

FEB. 1-14 Greek festival of God Dionysus – in which vines were pruned and sprinkled with wine, accompanied by ritual singing and dancing.
FEB. 15: Lupercalia (Festival of the Wolf): Pan’s Day—Honoring the Lord of the Wilderness, Animals, and Fertility. Coming of Spring.

FEB. 23: Egyptian Day of Nut: Goddess of Healing and Fertility

FEB. 28: Cake Day – Offering little cakes to the God and the Goddess; Remembering the ancestors with cakes and flowers.

MARCH

MAR. 4: Celtic Feast of Rhiannon: Moon Goddess, Underworld Goddess
MAR. 5: Navigium Isidis – Egyptian festival honoring Goddess Isis as Lady of the Moon and Ruler of the Sea; celebrated with the launching of a boat of offerings.

MAR. 9: Mother Goddess Day – honoring all Mother Goddesses – the loving, nurturing Goddess.

MAR. 11: Great Night of Shiva: vigil and feast for Transcendence

MAR. 14: Egyptian Festival of Au Set: Snake Goddess who wards off poverty

MAR. 17: Roman Liberalia: Maenad Festival of Bacchus (Dionysus)– honoring the God of the Vine and Rebirth.
Canaanite of Festival of Astarte: Goddess of Love

MAR. 20: – Ala Festival (Nigerian)
– Iduna’s Day (Norse)
– Alban Eilir (Celtic, Druid holiday)
– Spring Harvest Festival (Egyptian)

MAR. 20-21: Sumerian Festival – celebrating the return of Dumuzi (God of Life and Death) from the Underworld to be with Inanna (Goddess of Life) for the verdant part of the year.

MAR. 20 or 21: OSTARA SABBAT: Spring Equinox; The Goddess of Spring.Spring Equinox aka Vernal Equinox aka Ostara. Marks the beginning of Spring. Days and nights are exactly equal, the sun rises and sets in the exact east and west. This holiday represents the first creation, but also the annual creation (planting so crops grow each year) and most symbolic, the perpetual creation. Fertility symbols abound such as eggs and rabbits. Spring or Vernal Equinox begins a forty day period which culminates with May Day, another fertility Spring festival of ancient origin. The other three forty day periods are: Fall Equinox (Sept 22 or 23) to Halloween/AllSaints Day (Oct. 31, Nov.1), Dec. 25 to Imbolc/Candlemas (Feb 1 or 2) and of course, Lent. Lent is the forty day period beginning on Ash Wednesday and ending on Easter Sunday every year.

MAR. 24: Feast Day of Archangel Gabriel whose name means, “The High One’s Hero,” or “Hero of God,” or “Power of God,” or “Might of God.” Note this day comes one day before Annunciation Day when Gabriel performed his most famous task. Since 1970, the Catholic Church no longer recognizes this day for Gabriel, ending a thousand year plus tradition by opting to lump him in with Raphael and Michael for a Feast of the Holy Archangels Day on Sept 29. Originally the Church had an angel for each of the four “corners” of the year, the solstices and equinoxes. It was the Church’s only recognition of these “pagan” holy days.

MAR. 25: Lady Day – honoring the Crone as Grandmother; Mother of the Mother.

MAR. 30: Babylonian Day of Bau: Mother of Ea (The Earth)

APRIL

APR. 1: Dark Mother Day –honoring Black Annis, Kali;
Fool’s Day—honoring the God of Chaos Energy.
Day of Venus: Goddess of Love and the Hunt
APR. 5: Roman Day of Fortuna: Goddess of Fate

APR. 7: Feast of Blajini—offerings made to the Other People/Sidhe or Faeries “Kindly Ones”.

APR. 7-8: Feast of Greek Goddess Artemis (Roman Diana) – who represents the feminine in Nature and protects women throughout their lives.

APR. 8: Day of Mooncakes—honoring the Moon Goddess.

APR. 15: – Feast of Tellus Mater (Roman)
– Festival of Ba’ast, Feast of Bast (Egyptian cat goddess)

APR. 16: – St. Padarn’s Day (Celtic)
– Feast of St. George (Byzantine)

APR. 15-17: Feast of the Seas – Honoring God-Goddess as Olokun-Yemaya (Yoruba/Santeria) and Okeanos-Tethys (Old Greek).

APR. 22: Earth Day – Day to honor the Earth and to meditate on Deity manifesting as Mother Earth
– Festival of Isthar (Babylonian)
– Feast of the Divine Couple (Japanese)
– Feast of Elaphebolia (Greek)
– Odin’s Day – Norse festival.

APR. 23: Festival of the Greenman—honoring the God of the Forest and vegetation.

APR. 25: – Spring Festivals – Dedicated to Herne, Pan, Horned God.
– Roman Robligalia – Corn Mothers (Ceres and Demeter) and Harvest.

APR. 25: Spring Festival – dedicated to the Horned God and Corn Mother.

APR. 28: Celebrated April 28 – May 3: Festival of Flora: remembrance of those who passed into the Underworld.

APR. 30: May Eve—Walpurgis Night; annual gathering of Witches and covens. Beltane Begins at Sundown (Celtic, Wiccan) Old Norse Feast.

APR. 30 – MAY 2: – Beltane – Celtic festival marking the arrival of summer in ancient times, celebrating Blodeuwedd (Goddess of Flowers) and Llew (Oak King, God of the Waxing Sun).
– Old Norse Feast – Celebrating Nanna (Goddess of Flowers), true love of Baldur (God of Light).
– Feast of Sacred Marriage – Honoring Goddess-God as Inanna & Dumuzi , Ishtar & Tammuz (Old Sumerian), Isis & Osiris (Egyptian), Oshun & Shango (Yoruba/Santeria).

MAY

MAY 1: BELTANE SABBAT: Festival of Spring and Fertility. Sidhe Day. Beltaine – Celtic festival marking the arrival of summer in ancient times.
MAY 4: Celtic/British Festival of Cerridwen and Brigit: Corn Goddesses of Fertility

May 4 – Celtic Festival of Cerridwen and Brigit – Corn Goddesses of fertility, healing, and poets.
– St. Monica’s Day (Irish)
– Veneration of the Thorn (Irish)
– Festival of Sheila Na Gig (Irish)

MAY 6: – Shepherd’s Day – Day to meditate on Deity as Lord of Animals: Dumuzi (Old Sumerian), Osiris (Egyptian), Pan (Old Greek), Shiva Pasupati (Hindu).
– Eyvind Kelve (Norse)

MAY 9: – Greek Feast of Artemis

MAY 9-12: Lemuria – Roman festival when the spirits of the dead are thought to revisit their homes.

MAY 13: – Roman Garland Day, Offering garlands to Neptune.
– Month of Hawthorn, Celtic festival of the tree.
– Our Lady of Fatima Day (Portugal)

MAY 14: – Isis Day in ancient Egypt

MAY 14: -16 Feast of Divine Love and Compassion – Source of healing and beneficence, honoring the Goddess as Isis (Old Egyptian), Oshun (Yoruba/Santeria), Lakshmi (Hindu).

MAY 15: – Festival of Vesta (Roman)
– Maia and Mercury’s Day (Roman)
MAY 18: – Celtic Feast of Greek God Pan – Who represents the masculine in Nature and protects men throughout their lives. Men recognized the transitions in their lives and honored male fertility.

MAY 19: Celtic Feast of Brigid – In which sacred healing wells and springs were adorned with flowers in honor of Goddess Brigid, daughter of Mother Goddess Danu and Father God Dagda.

MAY 21: Dark/Bright Mother Goddess Day—honoring Hecate/Demeter; Uma; Kali/Parvati .

MAY 26: – Festival of Diana begins (ends 31st) (ancient Roman holiday)

MAY 28: FEAST OF BENDIDIA—family feast day honoring of the Goddess of the Moon, Dark Moon, Underworld, Secret Wisdom and Witches.

May 30 – Frigg’s Day, Northern Goddess, spouse of Odin (Teutonic “heathen” European pre-Christian holiday)
– Feast of the Queen of the Underworld Begins (Roman)
– Feast of the Queen of Heaven (European)

JUNE
Month of Juno – Dedicated to Roman Goddess Juno, partner of Jove (God of Happiness), protector of marriage and family.
June 2 – Juno Regina’s Day (Roman)
– Sin’s Day (Norse)
– Shapatu of Ishtar (Babylonian)
– Seamen’s Day (Icelandish)
– St. Elmo’s Day
JUN. 5: Earth Mother Day—honoring Gaia/Tailtiu/Mother Earth. Calling forth good harvests.

JUN. 11: – Feast of Matuta (Roman)
– Matralia (Roman)
– Fortuna’s Day (Roman)

JUN. 13: Feast of Epona – The Celtic Horse Goddess honoring the Goddess of the Horse [Otherworld Guide].
– Athena’s Day (Greek)
– Minerva’s Day (Roman)

JUN. 14: – Vidar’s Day (Norse)
– Birthday of the Muses (Greek). Music, the arts & inspiration “born”

JUN. 16: – Night of the Teardrop (Egyptian)

JUN. 18: Roman Day of Anna – Goddess Danu to the Celts. Early Christian-Pagans made sure Anna entered the Kristian story, making her Yeshua’s grandmother, Mary’s mother.

JUN. 20: – Iron Skegge’s Day (Norse)
– Festival of Edfu (Egyptian)
– Kuan-Yin Day (day she became a Bodhisattva)

JUN. 21: LITHA SABBAT: Summer Solstice; celebrating Fullness of the Year, Midsummer’s Ever: offerings to the Other People.
– Day of Cerridwen and her Cauldron (English/Welsh)
– Day of Aine of Knockaine (Irish)
– Day of the Green Man (Northern Europe)
– The Great Mother (British)
– Alban Hefin (Druidic)
– Waa-Laa Ends (Native American)
– Litha (Wiccan)
– All Hera’s Day (Roman)
– Ishtar’s Day (Babylonian)
– Astarte’s Day (Canaanite)
– Aphrodite’s Day (Greek)
– Yemaya’s Day (Brazilian)
– Aine’s Day (Irish)

JUN. 23: Day of the Lady and Lord of the Sidhe—Otherworld aspects of the Divine.
– Day of the Fairy Goddesses – Aine, Ana, Anu, Danu
– Celtic Day of the Greenman – Herne, Cernunnos, Lugh

JUN. 24: TEMPLAR HOLY DAY. In the Roman calendar this day was thought to be Summer Solstice. The Church renamed this pagan holiday to St. John the Baptist Day. Templars revered it highly. On Jun 24, 1314 a mysterious band of knights joined Robert the Bruce of Scotland on the battlefield making his victory at Bannockburn possible. These knights could only have been the a troop of disbanded and now in-hiding Templars who had fled to western Scotland. St. John’s day was used by Freemasons in 1717 to found the first public (non-Scottish) Order of Freemasonry in London. Masonic teachings are said to descend from the esoteric Christianity of Templarism. St. John the Baptizer was beheaded because he wouldn’t give in and sacrifice his principles. This is a Templar ideal, as is the constancy and regularity — order out of chaos — of the solstices and equinoxes. So for both reasons, Christian and “pagan,” we observe this day.
– Feast of the Sun (Aztec)
– Midsummer Bride (Swedish)
– Inti Raymi (Incan)
– Lady Luck (European)
– Burning of the Lamps at Sais (Egyptian)

JUN. 25: Parvati Praise Day – Women’s Festival for Earth Mother

JUN. 27: Day of the Lares: Household Deities (/Roman) – honored and tended —cleanse/rededicate household – Altars/shrines.

JUN. 29: Shiva Day: Lord of the Dance invoked for blessings

JUN. 30: Sumerian Day of Aestas: Corn Goddess

JULYU
JUL. 1: Crone Day – Kronia —honoring Kronos -Father Time and Rhea – Old Mother Nature.
JUL. 2: Roman Feast of Expectant Mothers.

JUL. 8 Celtic Month of Holly – Honoring the Holly tree.

JUL. 12-14: Feast of the Moon – Honoring Goddess as Selene (Old Greek), Ixchel (Maya), and Manat (Old Arabic-Sufi).

JUL. 13: Birth of Osiris – Egyptian God of Divine Youth, annually resurrected by Isis.

JUL. 17: Celtic Feast of Tailtiu – Mother Nature Goddess who fostered Lugh.

JUL. 21: Witch’s Day—Celebrating the Craft as life, practice and religion.

JUL. 19: Egyptian Opet Festival – Celebrating the marriage of Isis and Osiris.

JUL. 23: Roman Neptunalia: honoring Neptune, God of the Sea

JUL. 27: Belgium Procession of the Witches: Festival of Witches

JUL. 28: Archangel Auriel (Uriel) Day. His/Her name means “Fire or Light of God,” and titles include, Regent of the Sun, Angel of Music, Patron of Prophecy, Archangel of Salvation, Angel of the Presence. See Uriel.org for more about him/her, the crystal egg association, and paintings.

JUL. 29: Festival of Thor – Celebration of Norse God Thor

JUL. 31: thru Aug 2 – Lughnasadh – Old Celtic / Irish Feast of Goddess Tailtiu and God Lugh (Deities of Life and Light), celebrating the grain harvest. Aug. Eve; Sun God, Harvest God, Horned God willing to become the grain of life.
– Lammas, harvest festival coming 40 days after Summer Solstice, offer 1st fruits to the Divine (See Aug. 1)
– Festival of Loki – Day to honor Norse trickster god Loki and his consort Sigyn
– Feast of the Grain Harvest – Honoring Goddess Demeter & Kore (Old Greek), and God as Osiris (Egyptian).

AUGUST

AUG. 1: LUGHNASSADH / LAMMAS SABBAT: First Harvest—Bread Harvest. First Harvest Festival of the Celtic Sun God Lugh.
AUG. 2: Feast of the Black Madonna – Gnostic celebration of the Dark Goddess

AUG. 3: Day of the Dryads – Greek celebration of the Macedonian maiden spirits of woods and water.

AUG. 3-4: Feast of Old Greek Goddess Artemis (Roman Diana) – Defender of rights and liberties, and punisher of rapists and oppressors.

AUG. 5: Celtic Tree Month of Hazel begins.

AUG. 6: Celtic Fire Festival of Tan Hill.

AUG. 9: Druid Feast of the Fire Spirits
– Roman Vinalia Rustica: wine festival of Venus and Pan

AUG. 11-13: Feast of Father Sky – Honoring God as Obatala (Yoruba/Santeria), Ouranos (Greek), Svarog (Slavic), Thor (Norse), Taranis (Celtic), Dyaus (Hindu).
– Celtic Puck Fair – Fertility Festival.

AUG. 12: The Lights of Isis, Festival of the Egyptian Goddess Isis.

AUG. 19: Roman Vinalia: Marriage of Bacchus

AUG. 20: Marriage of the God and Goddess—Sun God enters Earth Goddess and rules Underworld as Lord of the Shadows.

AUG. 21: Festival of Hecate—Invoking her to protect the harvests now that the God resides within her aspect as the Earth Goddess.

AUG. 21: Greek Festival of Hecate – To protect the harvest.

AUG. 24: Feast of Egyptian God Osiris – Partner and true love of Isis, and father of Horus; guide of all husbands, fathers, and judges.

AUG. 25: Norse God Odin receives knowledge.
– Roman Festival of Goddess Ops – Lady of the Cornucopia, Bounty of the Harvest and Sustainer of Life.

AUG.27: Feast of Egyptian Goddess Isis – Partner and true love of Osiris, and mother of Horus; guide of all wives, mothers, healers, advocates, and teachers.

AUG. 28: Norse Harvest Festival.

AUG. 29 -Sep 11: Return of Isis – Egyptian festival marking the return to Egypt of Goddess Isis (as the star of Sept/Sirius) and God Osiris (as the rising Nile River).

SEPTEMBER

AUG. 29 – SEPT. 11: Return of Isis & Osiris (star Sirius, rising Nile waters)
SEP. 2: Grape Vine Festival honoring Ariadne & Dionysus

SEP. 9 – 11: Feast of Mother Earth (Greek, etc)

SEP. 9 – 18: Greater Eleusinian Mysteries (Greek): rites of Demeter/Persephone/Hades done every five years. (prepare on the 2nd, initiates on the 11th, purifying sea bath or sea salt bath on the 12th, offerings of barley and grain on the 13th, ‘holy basket of Demeter’/Persephone’s adduction by Hades on the 14th, torch procession for Demeter’s search on the 15th, Holy Night/Initiations/Dedications show mystery/promise of renewed life on the 16th, games/sports/Feast of Divine Life dedicated to Triple Goddess of Kore-Demeter-Persephone on the 18th, return with earthen jars representing the womb of Demeter on the 19th).

SEP. 13: Egyptian Lighting the Fire Ceremony for all departed souls —honoring with candlelight the spirits of the dead.

SEP. 19: Feast of Thoth, Egyptian scribe god

SEP. 21 – 23: MABON SABBAT: Autumn Equinox; Second Harvest—Vine Harvest; Harvest Home/Thanksgiving Feast/Winter-finding for the Norse. The Fall Equinox always begins the forty day
– Birthday of Athena, Greek Goddess of Wisdom also known as Sophia
– Babylonian Ishtar’s Day: Great Goddess
Sep or sometimes Oct (day varies) Rosh Hashanah, Jewish New Year, always followed ten days later by

SEP. 26 – Oct 5: Navaratri, Hindu Festival of the Great Goddess – Huge holiday in India when Goddess destroys evil and restores cosmic order
Mesopotamian Day of the Sheepfolds: sacrifice to Goat God Azazel.

SEP. 27: Mesopotamian Day of the Willows: Festival of Astarte/Asherah

SEP. 29: Greek Festival Of Nemesis: Goddess of Fate

OCTOBER

OCT. 2: Feast of the Guardian Spirits—honoring spirit guides and helpers.
OCT. 4: Roman Jejunium Cereris: Fast Day for Ceres

OCT. 9-11: Feast of Divine Wisdom – Source of all knowledge, honoring God-Goddess as Odin-Frigg (Norse); and Goddess as Sophia/Wisdom (Christian), Truth/Maat (Egyptian), Metis (Greek), Sarasvati (Hindu), & Manat (Arabic-Sufi).

OCT. 13: Knights Templar Remembrance Day
Greek Thesmophorus: five-day women’s pilgrimage for Aphrodite as Goddess of Genetyllis (childbirth), Demeter as Mother of a beautiful child (Persephone), with revelry the first day, celebration the second, temple of Demeter the third, fast and mourning for Persephone the fourth, and rejoicing the fifth day.
Oct 18 English Great Horn Fair – Festival of Herne.

OCT. 18: Great Horn Festival—Horned God and Lady of the Wood invoked for the fertility of wild game and the Hunting Season.

OCT. 24: Raphaelmas, Feast of Archangel Raphael, whose name means, “The High One Heals.” Since 1970, the Catholic Church no longer recognizes this day for Raphael, ending more than a thousand years of tradition by opting to lump him in with Gabriel and Michael for a Feast of the Holy Archangels Day on Sept 29.

OCT. 24: Druid Feast for Spirits of Air

OCT. 26 – NOV. 2: Egyptian Zetesis and Heuresis search and recovery of Osiris by Isis.
– Isia – Egyptian festival recalling Set (God of Destruction) killing God Osiris; Goddess Isis mourning Him, resurrecting Him, and conceiving God Horus with Him; and Osiris becoming Lord of Amenta, land of the dead. He weighs souls against the Feather of Truth on Goddess Maat’s Scale of Justice, but defers to Isis for those who fail the test.

OCT. 31: Samhain / Hallowmas / Halloween – Celtic New Year and feast of Cerridwen (Goddess of Death) and Beli (the Holly King, God of the Waning Sun). Last Harvest; New Year, day when the veil between the worlds is thinnest (God enters the Goddess’ womb for rebirth, hence the tomb become the womb. Third Harvest—Root Harvest; All Hallows Ever: Dark God and Dark Goddess united in the Underworld allow spirit communication at this most holy [hallowed] time.
– 31 – NOV. 2: Descent of Inanna – Sumerian fast recalling the descent of Inanna (Goddess of Life) to the Underworld. Ereshkigal (Goddess of Death and Rebirth) detained Her until She agreed to have Dumuzi (God of Life and Death) remain there each Winter.
– Fast of Hod – Norse fast marking Hod (blind God of Darkness) unintentionally killing Balder (God of Light), and devoted Nanna (Goddess of Flowers) dying of a broken heart.

NOVEMBER

0CT. 31 – Nov 6: Mid-Autumn / Day of the Dead / Hallowmas – Festival marking the transformation of life to death, the end of the agricultural year, departure of migrating and hibernating animals, and decay and death of vegetal and animal life. Observed by remembering departed ancestors and contemplating one’s own mortality.
NOV. 1: Cailleach’s Reign—Day of the Banshees; honoring the Riders of the Wild Hunt who search for souls to transport to the Land of Shadows. Reign of Celtic Cailleach, Crone Goddess.

NOV. 2: – White Tara Day. Day for meditation on Tantric Bodhisattva Goddess, White Tara, who guides the dead to Buddha Amitabha’s Pure Land, where all will find salvation.
– Egyptian Festival of Hathor: Mother of the Gods

NOV. 7 – 9: Feast of Divine Justice – Source of just law, honoring Goddess-God as Maat-Thoth (Egyptian); Goddess as Themis (Greek), Justice (Christian), and God as Forseti (Norse).

NOV. 11: Feast of Dionysus – Greek God whom Yeshua was “connected to” as the Cosmic Gnosis.
– Celtic Lunatishees—Day of the Fairy Sidhe; honoring the Other People in whom is held the immortal life force; Old November Eve [Samhain on old calendar].

NOV. 13: Festival of Jupiter – Roman deity associated with rain and agriculture, prime protector of the state, and concerned with all aspects of life.
– Roman Fontinalia – Feast of Fons, God of Springs.

NOV. 14: Feast of Musicians and Bards – Druid celebration of the Celtic musical arts.

NOV. 16: – Thracian Night of Hecate, Greek Goddess of the Hags or Wisewomen, (later called Witches), her name comes from Heqa-ma’at, a goddess in the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead who later became Hekmah or Hokmah (also spelled Chokmah) meaning wisdom in the ancient Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). From Heqa-ma’at / Hecate / Hokmah we get the Greek word for wisewoman or holywoman, “hag”. Honoring Hecate – Thracian Goddess of the Moon, Magick, and Witches as the Teacher of the Craft.

NOV. 22: NIGHT OF SHIVA—family feast day honoring Shiva as the Pillar of Light/the life-force as the Infinite Light, with oil lamps and candlelight.
– Roman Festival of Diana: Goddess of Moon, Hunt, Wilderness, Birth.

NOV. 27: Uma/Parvati Day—honoring the Goddess as Queen and Mother of the Universe.

NOV. 29: Egyptian Feast of Hathor—honoring the Goddess as Horned Mother, and also as Sekhmet, the Lion Goddess of the Sun, and as Bastet, the Cat Goddess of Fertility and Life—Triple Goddess Bast-Hathor-Sekhmet.

DECEMBER

DEC. 1: – Greek / Roman Day of Pallas Athena / Minerva.
– Day for Meditation on Tantric Bodhisattva Goddess Red Tara – Protector against evil and harm.
DEC. 3: – Roman Day of Cybele / Rhea – The Great Mother.

DEC. 4: – Feast of Shango – Orisha who defends against evil.

DEC. 6: – Mindfulness Day – Zen Buddhist day for mindfully seeing and acting with compassion for the poor and oppressed.

DEC. 7: – Haloia of Demeter.

DEC. 7 – 9: Feast of the Immanent Feminine Divine Spirit – Honoring Goddess as Maha Devi Shakti (Hindu), Holy Spirit Wisdom (Christian).

DEC. 8: Rohatsu – Zen Buddhist celebration of the Buddha’s enlightenment.

DEC. 11: – Sacred to Arianrhod.

DEC. 12: – Fiesta of Our Lady of Guadalupe – Mother of God and Mother of the Oppressed.

DEC. 13: – Feast of the Light-bringer – Honoring Goddess as Juno Lucina (Old Roman).

DEC. 14 – 28: Halcyon Days: time of tranquility.

DEC. 17: – Yoruba / Santeria feast of Orisha Babalu Aye – Healer of deadly diseases.
– Roman/Greek: Saturnalia begins festival to Saturn/Kronos as Harvest and Father Time with His scythe

DEC. 18: – Sacred to Epona.

DEC. 19: – Modresnact: Norse Mothers Night Festival.

DEC. 21: – thru 25 – Old Egyptian festival of Isis, the Magna Mater (Mother of God and Mother of All) giving birth to God Horus.
– YULE SABBAT: Winter Solstice; Return of the Sun God.

DEC. 23: – Sacred to Hathor.

DEC. 24: – Celtic Tree Month – Month of Reed ends, Tree Month of Elder begins.
– Celtic / German Nodlaig Eve/Modresnach: Night of the Great Mother

DEC. 25: – European Feasts of Herne, Frey, Dionysus – Birth of the God, the Light of the World.

DEC. 25: thru Jan 5: Old Norse festival honoring Saturn, Dionysus, Frey and Freya (Deities of Fertility) and the birth of the new-born Baldur (God of Light) with evergreens, fires, and feasting.

DEC. 28: – Sacred to Freya.

DEC. 31: Hogmanay—New Year’s Eve; Crone preparing to depart, winter at its height; Crone, old and withered year changes at midnight into young and fresh New Year. Hag’s Eve.
– Egyptian Lucky Day of Sekmet – Sekmet, the ravaging lioness, with her burning solar eye, is the destroyer/devourer aspect of the goddess.




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Festival Do's

  • If you're asked to do something by a festival or event coordinator, please do it. These people are volunteers, and if one of them asks you to watch children for an hour or carry a bag of trash to a dumpster, help out and take care of it. It will free them up to do what they're supposed to be doing - coordinating.
  • Bring your own supplies. If you know ahead of time you're going to be attending a workshop or class, bring your own craft supplies, magical tools, divination materials or notebook/pencil when possible.
  • Be respectful of presenters. If you're attending a seminar or lecture, bear in mind that the presenters often are giving their time as a donation -- or that the organizers had to shell out a good amount of money to book them -- and many drive long distances to come share their knowledge with you. Don't monopolize their time, and don't talk during their class. Save the chit-chat for afterwards.
  • Make a donation or a "love offering" if the opportunity presents itself. Nearly every Pagan and Wiccan festival is put on by non-profit groups, which means they have to pay for the site rental, food, entertainment, and presenters all out of donations. If you have a chance to toss a few dollars in a pot, do so.
  • If you're attending a multi-day event, be sure you bring enough food for yourself. No one wants to have to go around begging the last three days of a campout because they've run short. The bigger problem is that other people will have enough for themselves, but if they share with you, then THEY run short. Plan ahead and bring a little more than you think you'll need.
  • Pay attention to rules regarding nudity. Some events are clothing-optional, and if they are, they'll say so. However, just as many festivals take place in locations that forbid nudity, such as public parks or beachs. Also, in many cases organizers don't want any nudity because they're trying to promote a "family friendly" atmosphere. While there's nothing wrong with nudity, not everyone wants their child to see total strangers naked.
  • Be respectful of others' beliefs. You may be pretty certain that your version of Wicca is the best one, but you don't have to belittle the beliefs of other paths in the process. That includes being respectful of non-Pagan paths such as Christianity.
  • Do practice safe sex. If you're going to hook up with someone you met at a festival, please do so responsibly.
  • If you bring your children, please keep an eye on them. It may be difficult and you may have to miss a couple of workshops, but they're your kids. If you can't watch them at the event, find a sitter.

Festival Don'ts

  • Do NOT take pictures of someone without their permission. Many Pagans and Wiccans are still in the broom closet, and that's their choice. If you want to take a photo of a friend, make sure there's no one in the background who can be identified, unless you've checked to make sure it's okay first.
  • Don't touch other people's stuff. Most Pagans and Wiccans are very particular about the handling of their magical tools. To pick up someone's wand or athame and gush about how nice it is... well, it's a HUGE breach of protocol. Ask permission before touching anything.
  • Don't argue with vendors about the worth of their merchandise. Believe me, there's nothing worse than knowing a person spent literally weeks crafting a beautiful object, and then seeing someone haggle because they don't think it's worth it. It's one thing if you're short on cash, but don't ever tell an artisan that their time and skill is valueless.
  • Be on time. Unfortunately, the notion of Pagan Standard Time has become more and more of an issue -- the idea that all Pagans show up twenty minutes late. That's unacceptable if you're attending a scheduled workshop or class. When a presenter is in the middle of a session and half the group saunters in late, it's practically a guarantee that the organizers won't get that person back next year.
  • Don't throw anything into a ritual fire unless you are specifically invited to do so. It's not a place for you to toss your trash, and certain herbs can cause allergic reaction in some people. If there's something you'd like to add to a fire, ask one of the fire handlers to do it for you.
  • Don't complain about a lack of volunteer personnel. Volunteers are just that -- volunteers! If an event is short of them, then it's because not enough people were willing to donate their time and energy. Instead of complaining, offer to help out with future events.
  • Don't interrupt people who want privacy. It's not uncommon to see someone meditating, alone, at a huge festival. If you stumble across such a person, don't bother them. Respect their need for solitude.
  • Don't show up intoxicated or under the influence of drugs. If an event is held in a public place, you could find yourself ejected for disruptive behavior. Remember, you're entitled to have a good time, but you're not entitled to ruin everyone else's fun.

So there you have it -- a few simple, common-sense guidelines that will not only allow you to have a great time at a festival, but that will also allow others to enjoy it as much as you. Now go forth, go to your event, and may it be a wonderful experience for you!

In Light and Service;

Raven Dolick M.s.D.

Thank you for choosing RavenStar Enchantments Spiritual Awareness Center for your Metaphysical needs and desires.

 

 

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